EDB 301 Social Foundations of Education Spring 2016

EDB 301-1: Social Foundations of Education 3 credits

Syllabus, Spring 2016

Instructor: Dr. David I. Backer
Phone: Email: d.backer@csuohio.edu, david.backer@gmail.com
Office: JH 371 Office Hours:  TR 1-4pm
Meeting Times: TR 430-545pm Room: JH 191

Course Description

Must be admitted to the college as a declared major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher to be eligible for this course. An examination of the school in its cultural context. Emphasis is on the historical, social, economic, and technological forces that shape current educational discourse. Special emphasis is placed on the role of diversity in educational decision-making. This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement. Offered every semester.  

Course Rationale/Basic Course Questions

Social Foundations in Education is offered for teacher candidates and those interested in ideas foundational to the study of education. Course questions: What are the social foundations of education? Is the purpose of education to reproduce society as it exists, or improve society to make it better? What is critical pedagogy? How/why is critical pedagogy a way of teaching, learning, and studying the social foundations of education.

Texts

All reading material will be made available by PDF at davidbacker.com/classes.

Course Goals and Objectives

Cognitive Objectives:

  1. Students will understand how historical, social, economic, &technological forces influence educational policy.  (Contextualism)
  2. Students will understand the dilemmas inherent in public education within a pluralistic democratic society. Students will understand the dilemmas inherent in public education within a pluralistic democratic society.  (Contextualism)

Skill Objectives:

  1. Students will be able to analyze in an extended written and oral format historical, social, economic, and technological forces in shaping educational policy and practice. (Contextualism)
  2. Students will be able to apply course readings in class discussions, presentations, and assignments on topics related to cognitive objectives (Contextualism, Professionalism)

 III. Disposition Objectives:

  1. Students will approach course material with a level of openness, demonstrating a willingness to critically examine their own and others’ point of view.  (Contextualism, Partnership, Professionalism)

Instructional Strategies/Activities Related to Technology and Diversity

The course integrates the use of technology through students’ presentation of a topic that students, their families, and their communities confront that is related to education.   Attention to the issue of diversity is multi-dimensional, addressing this topic historically and in terms of current educational policy and practice.  

Course Requirements

General Education Statement (undergraduate courses only, if applicable)

In fulfilling the General Education Requirement, the course exposes undergraduate students to the discipline of education, provides basic knowledge, and cultivates core skill areas of writing due to its status as a Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) course.

Field Requirements (not applicable)  

Assignments/Assessments

FEI papers

FEI paper are Fact-Evaluation-Interpretation (FEI) papers. These three words refer to a technique of writing meant to encourage close reading and discussion. Full credit on an FEI paper requires three components:

  • Write a factual question about the text and answer it yourself by looking it up elsewhere (internet, wikipedia, dictionary, encyclopedia)
    • Factual questions include: What does [a word] mean? Who is [a person]? When did [an event] happen? What is [a thing]?
  • Write an evaluative statement about the text (500 words)
    • Evaluative statements include: I disagree with [position or idea]. I relate to [idea] because in my own life [personal experience]…
  • Write an interpretive question about the text (no answer, 100-300 words)
    • Interpretive questions include: When the author says [passage], does s/he mean [an interpretation] or [another interpretation]? On the one hand, the author says [passage], but then elsewhere s/he says [different passage]–is that inconsistent? Is the real meaning of what the author is saying [your thought], or is it something else? When I read [passage], I think it means [your thought]–but I’m not sure because [doubt]. Am I right? In one reading, I thought [something] was true, but in this reading the author says [passage]. Is [something] really true?

(Please include page numbers for all questions and statements in the FEI paper.) You will be required to hand in at least 15 FEI papers throughout the semester, bringing a printed copy of it to class on the day of the relevant reading.

Midterm Paper

Address an educational reality for residents of the Buckeye neighborhood in Cleveland. The educational reality should focus on present, past, or future issues relating to schooling such as attendance, test scores, school lunch/nutrition, poverty, family issues, racial demographics/segregation, gender dynamics, housing, violence (domestic, gang-related, state), crime rates, urban development/gentrification, transportation, or others. Focus on 1-2 groups of residents, including adults, children, parents, teachers, or policymakers. Your paper should “address” this reality by (1) describing it using history, data, and other research; (2) proposing or indicating solutions or ways to improve/sustain/revitalize that educational reality.

Use at least five valid outside sources in your midterm paper. This does not include Wikipedia, dictionaries, or other general reference texts. Instead use peer-reviewed articles, government-issued reports or data, newspaper articles, websites, and published books.

You will write two drafts of this paper, and upload the second draft to Taskstream.

Community Action Project, Journal, and Presentation

Critical pedagogy means questioning, challenging, and changing the social status quo through teaching, learning, and studying. Part of this work is becoming an activist in schools and communities. Throughout this semester, you will become involved with a community action project taking place in the Buckeye neighborhood of Cleveland. The project is to participate in the co-creation of a community school at PURCH, a house/non-profit organization on 117th street.

For the project, you will become a member of this school’s community, helping to create the school from the ground up. Throughout the semester, you will make five visits to the PURCH house and keep a journal after each visit. Journal entries should be at least 1,000 words each and include rich descriptions of what you see, think, and feel at PURCH. At the end of the semester, you will turn in all your journal entries and present two of your most interesting/impactful/meaningful journal entries.

Grading criteria

Rather than the professor “giving” students grades, students will take the measure of their own progress throughout this course. After the midterm and final assignments you will complete a survey which requires you to propose a grade for yourself based on your own standards of success. The professor will either agree or disagree with the proposal, and you have the option to negotiate thereafter.

 Assignment                                                         Percentages

20 FEI papers 30%
Midterm paper 30%
Final project journals 20%
Final project presentation 20%

Scale for converting graded components to a CSU letter grade

%
A 95-100
A- 90-94
B+ 88-89
B 83-87
B- 80-82
C+ 78-79
C 70-77
D 60-69
F Below 60

Course Outline

Date Assignment Reading Link/pdf
Part 1: Central Themes and Ideas of Critical Pedagogy
1/19/16 Introduction to course, syllabus, and story circle, practicing FEI writing (all links on syllabus website: davidbacker.com/classes)
1/21/16 FEI 1 PURCH house talk; Backer, D. Elements of Discussion (p. 1-51) (sent via email)
1/26/16 FEI 2 Backer, D. Elements of Discussion (p. 1-51), part 2
1/28/16 FEI 3 hooks, b. “Confronting Class in the Classroom” hooks–class
2/2/16 FEI 4 McLaren, P. Critical Pedagogy: A Look at the Major Concepts Critical Pedagogy Major Concepts
2/4/16 FEI 5 McLaren, P. Critical Pedagogy: A Look at the Major Concepts (same as above)
2/9/16 PURCH Story Circle 1 No reading. Prepare a 5-minute informal presentation telling the class about your first visit(s) to PURCH. Bring your first journal entries and be ready to tell a story, offer a question, or think together with the group about what happened.
2/11/16 FEI 6 Samuel Bowles & Herbert Gintis, Schooling in Capitalist America,

Chapter 1, p.1-17

BowlesandGintisSelections
2/16/16 FEI 7 Greene, M. “Teaching as Possibility: A Light in Dark Times” Maxine Greene
Part 2: Foundational Concepts For Critical Pedagogy
2/18/16 FEI 8 Freire, F. Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Chapter 2 FreireSelections
2/23/16 FEI 9 Freire, F. Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Chapter 3 (same as above)
2/25/16 FEI 10 Marx, K. Selections from Capital, Vol.1 Capital 1 + Capital 2
3/1/16 FEI 11 Ken, Ivy. “Beyond the Intersection: A New Metaphor for Race-Class-Gender Studies” Ivy – 2008 – Beyond the Intersection A New Culinary Metaphor for Race-Class-Gender Studies
First Draft

Due 3.13.16

*Fill out Midterm Grade Proposal Survey

Mid-term Paper: Address an educational reality for residents of the Buckeye neighborhood in Cleveland in a 5-7 page paper. The educational reality should focus on present, past, or future issues relating to schooling such as attendance, test scores, school lunch/nutrition, poverty, family issues, racial demographics/segregation, gender dynamics, housing, violence (domestic, gang-related, state), health (mental, physical), crime rates, urban development/gentrification, transportation, or others. Focus on 1-2 groups of residents, including adults, children, parents, teachers, or policymakers. Your paper should “address” this reality by (1) describing it using history, data, and other research; (2) proposing or indicating solutions or ways to improve/sustain/revitalize that educational reality.

Use at least five valid outside sources in your midterm paper. This does not include Wikipedia, dictionaries, or other general reference texts. Instead use peer-reviewed articles, government-issued reports or data, newspaper articles, websites, and published books.

You will write two drafts of this paper, and upload the second draft to Taskstream.

Part 3: Applying Critical Pedagogy in the Classroom
3/3/16 FEI 12 “Critical Pedagogy and Teaching Mathematics for Social Justice,” Stinson et al.  302-1610-1-PB (1)
3/8/16 FEI 13 “Teachers’ Reflections on Critical Pedagogy in the Classroom,” Leanna Katz. eScholarship UC item 2c6968hc (1)
3/10/16 FEI 14 “It Should Just Be Education: Critical Pedagogy Normalized as Academic Excellence” Scorza et al. It_should_just_be_education_Critical_ped
Part 4: Critiquing Critical Pedagogy
3/22/16 FEI 15 “Critical Thinking and Critical Pedagogy: Relations, Limits, Differences” by N. Burbules and R. Berk  Link to the article here
3/24/16 FEI 16 Illych, I. Deschooling Society: “Why We Must Disestablish School” ivan-illich-deschooling-society
3/29/16 FEI 17 Ranciere, J. The Ignorant Schoolmaster: “An Intellectual Adventure” RanciereSelections
3/31/16 FEI 18 Ranciere, J. The Ignorant Schoolmaster: “The Ignorant One’s Lesson” (same as above)
4/5/16 FEI 19 Ellsworth, E. “Why Doesn’t this Feeling Empowering?” ellsworth-1989
4/7/16 PURCH Story Circle 2 No reading. Prepare a 5-minute informal presentation telling the class about your most recent visit to PURCH. Prepare to present your most recent journal entry on the community activism project.
4/12/16

Re-write of Midterm due

FEI 20 Freire, P. & Horton, M. We Make the Road by Walking, Editor’s Introduction

*KWL Chart activity (in class)

WeMakeIntro
4/14/16  Class Cancelled Take time to find your article-of-interest
4/19/16  Article Presentations and Voting  Bring in a hard copy of your article and prepare to summarize what it is about
4/21/16  FEI 22  bell hooks, “Teach 11: Heart to Heart, Teaching with Love,” from Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope. Teaching Community Chp on Love

(Non-required reading: Teaching Community Chp 3 (“Race and Racism”, this reading is quite impactful and might trigger a strong reaction.))

4/26/16  FEI 23  EJ887746(1)
4/28/16  FEI 24  parental academic involvement
5/3/16  FEI 25  using_drama_pedagogy
5/5/16  FEI 26  Dover_Alison_G
5/10/16 Final Project presentations
5/12/16 Final Project presentations

Course Policies

  1. Attendance/engagement policy.  Regular attendance in this course is expected and noted. You are also expected to participate in class discussions concerning course readings.
  2. Late assignment policy.  Due dates for course assignments are indicated in the syllabus.  Late submissions of assignments are subject to a penalty of 10% reduction in the grade.  Please notify me before the due date if you anticipate a problem.
  3. Plagiarism/Academic Integrity.  The use of the intellectual property of others without attributing it to them is considered a serious academic offense.  Cheating or plagiarism may result in receiving a failing grade for the work or course.  The CSU Student Handbook describes plagiarism as stealing and/or using the ideas or writings of another in a paper or report and claiming them as your own. This includes but is not limited to the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment. Procedures of reporting plagiarism are described in the Student Handbook, available at http://www.csuohio.edu/studentlife/.  Additional information on plagiarism is available at the CSU Writing Center, RT Library 124; (216) 687-6981 or http://www.csuohio.edu/academic/writingcenter.
  4. Students with Disabilities. Please let me know if you need course adaptations or accommodations because of a disability.   Educational access is the provision of classroom accommodations, auxiliary aids and services to ensure equal educational opportunities for all students regardless of their disability. Any student who feels he or she may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the Office of Disability Services at (216)687-2015. The Office is located in MC 147. Accommodations need to be requested in advance and will not be granted retroactively.
  5. Technical Help.  If you have a question about course content, assignments, or other course activities, you should direct those questions to me. The steps below are for seeking help with technical questions only.
  • Call the 24/7 Blackboard Help Desk at 216-687-5050 and select option #2 for Blackboard Support
  • Chat with a live agent.

For general information or questions about eLearning, students may contact the Center for eLearning via phone (216-687-3960) or email (elearning@csuohio.edu). For email submissions, please provide your CSU ID number for the fastest response. The Center for eLearning operates Monday-Friday from 8 AM until 5 PM.

  • Visit the Open Computer Lab – JH 118 – during posted hours.
  1. Professional Dispositions—initial teaching licensure programs only.  One important aspect of your education is the development of professional dispositions—ways of working, thinking, and interacting with others—in three areas: Professionalism, Work Ethic, and Communication Skills. You should be monitoring your own development beginning now and continuing throughout your teaching career. The Student List of Professional Dispositions that you received with your acceptance into your program (also available at http://www.csuohio.edu/cehs/students/ofs/docs/FlagSystem.doc) is your guide.