History of Latin American Philosophy of Education

Syllabus used at Guttman Community College, City University of New York, Foundations of Humanities, Spring II 2014.

The course was inspired by work done with the Latin American Philosophy of Education Society, specifically Eduardo Mendieta’s essay “From Colonial to Decolonial Pedagogy: From Bello to Freire,” in Lapiz Vol. 1.

BASIC QUESTION

  • What is the history of Latin American Philosophy of Education?

COURSE READINGS AND SCHEDULE

INTRODUCTION

    • Day 1: Syllabus, etc.
    • Read (in class): E. Mendieta, “From Colonialism to De-coloniality…” in Lapiz, Vol. 1.

Pre-Columbian

    • Day 2: Read (homework): Leon-Portilla, M. Aztec Thought and Culture,
      • Introduction: Philosophy and Culture in Ancient Mexico
      • Chapter IV. The Approach to Man in Nahuatl Thought, p.104-134 (PDF)
    • Day 3: Read (homework): Leon-Portilla, M. Aztec Thought and Culture
      • Chapter V. Nahuatl Man: Creator of a Way of Life, p.134-177 (PDF)

Conquest and Evangelism

  • Day 4: Read (homework): de Las Casas, B. (1992). The Only Way. H. R. Parish (Ed.). Paulist Press.
    • Prologue: Humanity of the Indians, p.63-67
    • The Only Way: Winning Mind and Will, ‘The Ideal Missionary” p.103-112 (PDF)
  • Day 5: Read (homework): de Las Casas, B. (1992). The Only Way. H. R. Parish (Ed.). Paulist Press.
    • The Opposite Way: Violating the Mind and Will, “Wars for conversion contradict the human way,” p.121-124
    • “The Brutal Missionary,” p.151-156. (PDF)

Liberal and Catholic

  • Day 6+7: Read:  de la Cruz, J. I. (1994). The answer/la respuesta. Ed. Electa Arenal. Trans. Amanda Powell. New York: Feminist Press at the City University of New York.
    • (“Introduction,” p.1-38)
    • “La Respuesta,” p.39-78
  • Day 8+9: Read:  de la Cruz, J. I. (1994). The answer/la respuesta. Ed. Electa Arenal. Trans. Amanda Powell. New York: Feminist Press at the City University of New York.
    • “La Respuesta,” p. 78-104

Popular and National Integration

  • Day 10+11: Bello, A., & Caldera, R. (1981). Anthology of Andrés Bello. General Secretariat, Organization of American States.
    • “Address Delivered at the Opening of the University of Chile, September 17th, 1843.”
    • “Philosophy of Understanding.”
  • Day 12+13: Read (homework): Mistral, G. (1993). A Gabriela Mistral Reader (Vol. 5). White Pine Press.
    • “Small Towns.”
    • “My mother”
    • “How I Write”
    • “Gabriela Thinks About Her Absent Mother”

Pedagogy of Liberation

  • Day 13 : Read (homework): “Socialism and Man in Cuba” by Ernesto “Che” Guevara, and “The Black Heralds” by Cesar Vallego, transcribed in Guevara’s “Green Notebook.”
  • Day 14 +15: Read (homework): Education as Critical Consciousness by Paulo Freire.
  • Days 16+17: Read (homework): Cardenal, E. (1982). The Gospel in Solentiname (Vol. 1). Orbis Books.
    • Introduction
    • Prologue to the Gospel of St. John
    • Jesus Teaches How to Pray
    • Nicodemus Visits Jesus

Assignments

FEIV

Reading and thinking are essential to this class. Each day will have 1-2 readings, and you must complete a short assignment for these readings. The short assignment is called an FEIV (fact, evaluation, interpretation video), and has three parts–each of which is a question that you ask of the reading, to which you provide the answer. For your reading, you will make a video of yourself talking about the following:

1) A factual question, with your answer to that question.

  • Factual questions include: What does [a word] mean? Who is [a person]? When did [an event] happen? What is [a thing]?

2) An evaluative question, with your answer to that question.

  • Evaluative questions include: Is it good to do [action]? Do I agree with [stance, action, etc]? How does [some facet of the reading] relate to my personal experience?

3) An interpretive question (without your answer).

  • Interpretive questions include: When the author says [passage], does s/he mean [an interpretation] or [another interpretation]? On the one hand, the author says [passage], but then elsewhere s/he says [different passage]–is that inconsistent? Is the real meaning of what the author is saying [your thought], or is it something else? When I read [passage], I think it means [your thought]–but I’m not sure because [doubt]. Am I right? In one reading, I thought [something] was true, but in this reading the author says [passage]. Is [something] really true?

FEIVs should be emailed to me at foundationsbacker@gmail.com. I will not consider FEI papers that come in after the relevant class has met, and FEI papers may not be made up for credit later.

A short commentary

  • is 800 words long.
  • is interpretive, not evaluative (about your personal experience), nor a summary of factual statements.
  • comes from a combination of your interests, the text, and classwork.
  • focuses on a theme, question, or passage(s)
  • makes several references to the text
  • expresses a thesis, question, or argument
  • may use aspects of your FEIVs

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